Home Health Care Tag

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Last week in Albuquerque, a classroom full of students sat learning proper methods in caring for elderly patients. This has become common in states across the U.S, as a surge in immigrant workers entering the home health and homecare workforce, has greatly diversified a workforce of approximately 3 million people who help older ailing adults remain in their homes without hospitalization. These older patients rely on homecare agency workers to assist them with basics such as bathing, getting dressed, and taking their medications on time.

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Study Indicates African American Patients Receiving Home Health Care Yield Higher Re-hospitalization Statistics

 

[caption id="attachment_15211" align="alignleft" width="300"]Homecare News Homecare visits and Re-hospitilazation[/caption]

More than 12 million people annually receive home health care services in the United States. A large percentage of these patients are considered elderly (above the age of 60). Home health care agencies afford families and individuals the convenience of treatment and monitoring within their homes for a variety of different ailments and conditions. Often times these homecare services occur on the heels of major surgeries or short and long term hospitalizations. A group of researchers at the University of Missouri recently conducted a study that suggests that within the larger group of elderly patients receiving home care following hospitalization, the sub-group of racial and ethnic minorities (in particular African Americans) may be at greater risk of returning to the hospital or emergency room (ER), compared those with the ethnicity of non-Hispanic whites.

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In this edition of the ALORA Home Health news blog, fresh off the presses is a recently published article presenting information on a study of middle-schoolers in the state of Florida. This study revealed that children who are more often acting as caregivers at home, spend almost two hours per day assisting older adult family members. The Washington Post and other news outlets carried this story not too long ago.

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Uptick Shows Signs of A Shift

During the years of 2016 & 2017, the overall usage nationwide of home health care and hospice services both experienced a significant uptick, with several millions of additional Medicare beneficiaries receiving care. Examining the most recent data pulled from Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B claims, there were nearly 58 million Medicare beneficiaries living in the United States by December 2017. This number was representative of a roughly 2 percentage points increase in the population compared to the year 2016. It is now estimated that within the  next 30 years, the overall number of enrolled beneficiaries approach 93 million. These numbers offer economic opportunity for home health agencies, hospice care facilities, EVV and home health software providers, aides and other players within the market.